Following the long, exhausting trip of searching for and applying to new jobs, you are absolutely justified in getting excited about an interview call. But following a short moment of celebration, the fear sets in: Your heart is already pounding, your palms are starting to perspiration, and you are wondering: Can the hiring manager scan your fear? In case the thought of sitting right across from a supervisor makes your stomach turn, you are not alone. But there is no need to let your nerves get the best of you! Attempt one these strategies that can help you feel calm, cool, and collected, or at least make you appear so.

1.Take a deep breath: While waiting to be greeted with your interviewer, take a few minutes to do a little bit of breathing exercises. In doing this, you can divert the annoying emotion you’re undergoing and be capable to concentrate on something else. Holistic wellness expert Andrew Weil, MD recommends breathing exercises, saying: Since breathing is something we could control and govern, it’s a tool for achieving a comfortable and clear state of mind. To do that most efficiently, breathe deeply through your nose and after that gradually blow it through the mouth. Repeat this 3 times, while concentrating on bettering your thoughts. The best thing about this technique is that you can do it anywhere, so if you feel your nerves begin to swell throughout the interview take another breath.

2.Don’t Fidget. Nervous fidgeting is among the most obvious signs that you are apprehensive, so one has to learn to get over this. The best go-to trick is to hold your hands clasped together on the table or clasped together on the lap in order to avoid any subconscious hair twirling which can look rather awkward. If you are a leg shaker, keep your hands on your lap and using a little pressure to your thighs helps one control the shaking to the minimal. If you believe you do not have any fidgety habits, do think again, most individuals are not conscious of their very own anxious tendencies because they are such an ingrained part of their natural behavior. To double check, try doing a couple of mock interviews with a friend who can call you on almost any fidgeting. Once you know just what to avoid, you can practice controlling it.

3.Make Eye Contact: Among the best ways to fool a recruiting manager into thinking you are more confident than you believe is to maintain steady, natural eye contact during the interview. Mary Griffin, a Human Resources Director of the national healthcare company says an obvious giveaway of nervousness is a lack of eye contact – looking down, looking away, and not looking at the interviewer directly in the eye. A more positive interviewee seems to be engaged with the interviewer. One way to remind yourself to make regular eye contact is to concentrate on a place between the interviewer’s eyes. On the other hand, make sure you steer clear from over doing the eye contact or you end up sending unwanted vibes! So remember to take natural breaks, such as looking down in your resume every once in a while. It is a balancing act, so just keep practicing until it feels comfortable.

4.Learn when to pause: A number of people have a tendency to ramble when they are nervous. This may be harmful as once we begin talking, it is incredibly easy to veer off topic and state what is needed, or worse, more than what’s appropriate. To preempt any rambling, attempt to answer every question with only one thought or idea at a time. The trick to mastering this method is to maintain your tone true, in order that if your answers are brief, they do not come off as dismissive or curt. If the interviewer would like you to elaborate on a topic, he or she will ask.

5.Think Positive: Calm your nerves by reminding yourself that you deserve to be there. Hey, you would not have been called for the interview in case you were not being seriously considered as a candidate. Utilize this knowledge to your edge to emotionally pump yourself up before the meeting. Remember to stay calm, collected, and confident when you walk in. Hiring managers are humans, too, and they will understand and forgive small blips. So with that in mind, unwind, collect your strength, and walk into that interview with a confidence.